Artwork

Illustrations of work in progress.

The final format will be a series of twelve A3 archive quality inkjet prints on watercolour paper.

I listened to the audio archive and selected various sections of the transcript. I then took a trip to explore books in the Readerships and Literary Cultures 1900-1950 book archive at Sheffield Hallam University. The archive is nestled in a custom made wooden pod within the Adsett’s library, it has book shelves (of course) and places to sit and read. It’s a special little reading place preserving words that were read in the first half of the 20th century. The work above is my first response, I’m planning 11 more.

adeleblog

Here is the second one. I especially like the Anderson shelter. It’s from WW2, but looks like it has been dug up and converted to a handy garden shed. This was common after the war had ended. The shelters date back to 1938 and were designed by Sir John Anderson each one protected six people from German air raids. I think that families must have been bigger then. The edition of Far From the Madding Crowd belonged to my grandfather, it’s bound in rather beautiful plum coloured leather with embossed gold lettering. I’m rather fond of the words from this transcript, we share some favourite books and I love the words ‘my life would have been less rich without reading’, so I have made sure that it is not obscured.

josieblogThis is Josie. I choose to put The Scarlet Pimpernel there because she describes it as the first book that ‘grabbed’ her. Aesthetically the colour and it’s battered state appeal to me.  This volume is in the Readerships and Literary Cultures 1900-1950 archive at Sheffield Hallam University.

mavisblog

The energy leaps out of the pages of Mavis’s transcript, if she ever sat down it was with a book. She seems to have read entire libraries, five books at a time, which is why there is more than one book in this piece of artwork.

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Dickens: not the London papers for you, child!

I met Jessie in 1997, still living in the Norfolk Park estate near the vicarage of St John’s Park where she had begun work at the age of 14 in 1920.

St John’s Vicarage, where Jessie worked. (Reproduced by permission of Sheffield Archives)

I visited her to interview her about her reading because I was writing about popular fiction in the 1930s. On every shelf in her tiny flat were pictures of her grandchildren, most of them in their graduation gowns. Yet Jessie herself never had any formal education.

Charles Dickens and Little Nell (Philadelphia, USA. By Smallbones. Reproduced under Creative Commons licence)

Jessie was born in 1906 and in 1920 became a wage-earner. The story of how she came to love Dickens in the 1920s reveals how much the status of Dickens has changed from the interwar period to the present day: from ‘childlike’ popular entertainer to classic author. The Cambridge academic Q D Leavis asserted in 1932, in Fiction and the Reading Public (p 157), that Dickens’

originality is confined to recapturing a child’s outlook on the grown-up world, emotionally he is not only uneducated but also immature.

Mercifully Jessie never encountered this diatribe against her favourite author and the class of people who were seduced by him. But by chance it was a comparably low opinion of Dickens and his association with uneducated readers that enabled her to gain access to his complete works.

I used to read the Times when I was 14 because my first job was in a vicarage as a cleaner. Now the Canon Greenwood he was a Londoner. At 14 I went to the vicarage and it was an old house and it was dreadful, scrubbing . . . I stayed there till I was 19 but he used to take the Sunday papers and of course I had a field day with them because we used to have an hour for lunch and the housekeeper she used to go to sleep and of course she seemed to resent me reading the newspapers. I don’t know why.  . . . He had some fantastic books – he had all Dickens’ books and she had all these in the kitchen in her bookcase.

Jessie’s employer, Canon Henry Francis Greenwood, Vicar of St John’s Park Sheffield

She said to me one day. ‘Now I think you will get more education, child,’ (she never called me my name, always ‘child’) ‘with Dickens’ books’ which when I did start I was a real Dickens fan, and I am now you see. Anything on there of Dickens or Shakespeare I am there, but it was through her – even her resentment gave me a gift. And I love Dickens’ characters – she let me take them home.

Charles Dickens (public domain)

She used to let me take the paper home if it was two or three days old but she used to resent that. Some of these people they resent poor people like we were, very poor, because my dad died when he was 47 and I was 14 and my mum was left to bring up three girls and she used to go out washing and cleaning. 

[The housekeeper] was so possessive with everything he the Vicar had – she was a proper giant to me.  She resented me probably it was because I wanted to know things and I knew things but she lent me the Dickens because she resented me reading the papers, the London papers.

In his book, Welcome to Sheffield: A Migration History, David Price makes the point that churches and chapels broadened the horizons of many who came into contact with them because their leaders had been educated outside Sheffield.[i] Her job at Canon Greenwood’s vicarage introduced Jessie to the London papers and the novels of Charles Dickens. Despite the drudgery she endured, the vicarage in which she spent the first five years of her working life made her aware of a world elsewhere.

St John’s Park Sheffield today

[i] David Price, Welcome to Sheffield: A Migration History (2018), p 4.

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